CentOS Stream and the end of the CentOS clone: perils, pitfalls, risks and opportunities for Red Hat

<img src="/images/centos_logo.png" style=“float: right”;> Red Hat unleashed the kraken with its recent announcement that its CentOS 8 clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux would be shut down in 2021 instead of 2029, to be replaced by the newish CentOS Stream 8. What is CentOS Stream? It is a reimagining of CentOS as a continuously delivered yet version-constrained development distribution that tracks ahead of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 yet stays within the RHEL 8 world from an ABI1-compatibility standpoint.
Read more →

How this Debian Stable user ended up with Google Chrome from Google’s repository

Update: On Jan. 1, 2021, an updated Chromium package moved into the Debian Stable repository. Hopefully it will also become part of the Testing repo and appear in the next Debian release. The original post follows: I guess I knew that the Chromium web browser — the code from the open-source project that is still coded by Google people but isn’t fully Googled— was very out of datein the Debian Stable repository.
Read more →

Vim tip: Open the last file you closed with :e#

I can’t believe I didn’t learn this earlier because now I do it all the time: If you close a file, as I often do with :bd, to open the last file you closed, type e# in command mode: :e# The last closed file opens in your current window. This is great for me because in my editing workflow, I have a story budget from one directory in one window, and I work on stories from a different directory in another.
Read more →

Running four sites on NearlyFreeSpeech.net should cost me $3.92 per month

NearlyFreeSpeech.net stands out among shared-hosting companies for many reasons, but its cost structure is one of the biggest. NFSN doesn’t charge a flat fee for an “unlimited” number of web sites, or a smaller fee for one or two sites. Instead, NFSN charges for what you use. Before I committed to switching my sites from Hostgator to NearlyFreeSpeech.net, I needed to make sure I wouldn’t be dinged for a Slashdot/Reddit/Hacker News-style traffic spike.
Read more →

Using rsync to update a Hugo blog

The one disadvantage of a static-site generator like Hugo is that after you create an entry and build your blog locally, you then have to figure out how to update your site on the server. And Hugo seems to change a whole lot of files with every run of the command hugo, even if you are only creating a single entry. There’s a heavy amount of encouragement to use GitHub to manage the blog and some kind of build utility to transfer the files to the web server.
Read more →