Using rsync to update a Hugo blog

The one disadvantage of a static-site generator like Hugo is that after you create an entry and build your blog locally, you then have to figure out how to update your site on the server. And Hugo seems to change a whole lot of files with every run of the command hugo, even if you are only creating a single entry. There’s a heavy amount of encouragement to use GitHub to manage the blog and some kind of build utility to transfer the files to the web server.
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I got a SinkShroom. Is it worth the money?

I bought this plastic drain stopper called the SinkShroom from Amazon. I removed the original stopper from our sink long ago and have been using another easily removed plastic sink stopper that was supposed to catch hair but never did. It didn’t work too well at all, but it sells for about $8. The SinkShroom and its bigger cousins the TubShroom and ShowerShroom have a lot of marketing behind them.
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Dave Winer is too important to think he’s accomplishing nothing

I read Dave Winer’s Scripting.com blog every day. I subscribe via email. Like everything Dave does, it makes me think. Today I wonder if I should set up an email subscription service of some kind for this blog. Email is the new hotness in marketing. Email addresses are like gold. Dave recently wrote about how he feels he’s reaching nobody with his blog, especially as it pertains to the political issues of the day (e.
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I love these clean electric guitar sounds

Electric guitars weren’t invented to make overdriven sounds, though they do excel at that. Made for electricity — and for the music of the day in the 1950s — the guitars created by Leo Fender’s company are capable of surprisingly sweet sounds that are as much at home in jazz as in country. I am particular struck by these Songbirds Foundation videos of guitarists playing stellar examples of 1950s Fender Stratocasters and Telecasters through amps that range from vintage Fender to a Dumble.
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Writing in git vs. blogging

Any of us who have been blogging over the past 10 or more years has written hundreds or maybe thousands of posts. I’m pretty sure I have at least a couple thousand. But blog writing and other writing are different. A blog tends to say “this is now, things below this are in the past, things above this will appear in the future.” It’s reverse-chronological. That’s not a horrible thing.
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